Easter

Good Friday 18 April 2014,
Easter Monday 21 April 2014

easter_eggs_bunny

When is Easter in the UK?

Each year the dates of the Easter holidays in the UK are different. Provided below are the key Easter dates. With Good Friday and Easter Monday observed as bank holidays in much of the UK, citizens enjoy an extra-long weekend and celebrate Easter in their different ways.

Easter 2014
Good Friday, April 18, 2014
Easter Sunday, April 20, 2014
Easter Monday, April 21, 2014

Easter 2015
Good Friday, April 3, 2015
Easter Sunday, April 5, 2015
Easter Monday, April 6, 2015

Easter 2016
Good Friday, March 25, 2016
Easter Sunday, March 27, 2016
Easter Monday, March 28, 2016

Easter Events 2014

Easter Eggstravaganza
Celebrate an eggstra-special Easter at Cadbury World

Bank of England Museum – Easter Eggcitement
Take part in a Treasure trail to find eggs hidden in the Museum, with a chocolate egg for every child who takes part. Children can also indulge their imagination by creating and decorating their own Easter basket to take home.

Easter at Harlow Carr
Brighten up this Easter and enjoy activities with an explosion of colour at Harlow Carr. Meet Easter Bunny, go mad with craft, and hunt down every colour of the rainbow on our exciting Easter egg activity trail.

The Peter Rabbit™ Egg Hunt
The Peter Rabbit™ Egg Hunt is a firm favourite in the Lake District family events calendar. This year, the event will take place on Thursday 4 April with 50 limited edition ceramic eggs to find.

Highclere Castle Easter egg hunt
The hunt will take you around the flowery meadows, woods and pretty gardens! Please fill in your details in the registration box if you want to take part in the hunt and also to get your letter and fun activity pack from the Easter Bunny!

National Trust
Enjoy a day out with the National Trust and discover 250,000 hectares of countryside, 710 miles of coastline and hundreds of special places across England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Easter Holidays

Easter started as a religious holiday in much of the world, and in some other places as a holiday to honour certain pagan deities.

From this origin hundreds of years ago to its present day celebration, the holiday has been associated with a variety of festivals and special events. For Christians, this is the most important holiday of all, as it marks the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the grave.

For non-Christians, Easter represents a day to celebrate the coming of spring in the northern hemisphere. As the holiday is relative depending on the days of the calendar, Easter is held on different days over the years.

Good Friday

Good Friday is a public holiday in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. On Good Friday, Christians remember the day when Jesus was crucified on a cross.

Since the early nineteenth century, Good Friday and Christmas Day were the only two days of leisure which were almost universally granted to working people. Good Friday today is a public holiday in much of the UK. Many businesses are closed on Good Friday.

Many churches throughout the UK hold a special service. This may be a communion service in the evening or a time of prayer during the day, especially around 3 o’clock as that is about the time of day when Jesus died.

It is traditional to eat warm ‘hot cross buns’ on Good Friday. Hot Cross Buns with their combination of spicy, sweet and fruity flavours have long been an Easter tradition. The pastry cross on top of the buns symbolises and reminds Christians of the cross that Jesus was killed on. It is also traditional to eat fish on Good Friday instead of meat.

Easter Monday

Easter Monday is a bank holiday in much of the UK, and while it has little religious significance, it is the occasion for numerous secular customs.

Non-Christian Celebrations 

For those who do not celebrate Christian holidays, Easter is still a very large and important special day. Traditional activities include the following:

  • Having an Easter Egg Hunt
  • Having Someone Dress Up Like the Easter Bunny
  • Wearing Spring Like Colours
  • Spring Cleaning

The Easter Egg Hunt is one of the most celebrated and best loved traditions of the entire Easter holiday. This involves people, usually children, who search for Easter eggs which have been hidden around a yard or a room by others. The eggs are plastic moulded eggs which have been split in half and have one hinge which holds them together. Inside, the eggs typically hold some sort of candy or other snack. The candy is kept by the one who finds that particular egg.

The rabbit is a sign of spring, since the animals begin their mating seasons, and baby rabbits are often seen. In addition to the Easter bunnies seen around town, there will also be an onslaught of Easter bunny stuffed toys and such found at all the toy stores and even the supermarkets around the UK. The shops have mountains of Easter themed toys and chocolates that make great gifts for family and friends. Finally, another tradition in the UK for Easter celebrations is Spring Cleaning. Its a great time to spend cleaning out the clutter and cleaning out the cob webs. Easter holidays provides a chance to clean and have fresh start leading into the warm seasons of late spring and summer, some of the best times to be in the United Kingdom.

Christian Celebrations
Easter is one of the most important celebrations for Christians around the world.. The very idea of Christianity is that Jesus Christ, the Son of God, was crucified and buried on Good Friday, three days (by sun up and sun down standards) before Easter Sunday. Easter can refer to Easter Sunday, the specific day. However, sometimes it can also refer to the period of time before Pentecost. This period of time was traditionally forty days, but it was changed to fifty days after some time.

In modern times in the UK, Easter is celebrated by church attendance and family togetherness. Typically families will get together with a large meal in order to celebrate the holiday. Also, certain passages are often read aloud in order to commemorate the special events of the day. Typically, these verses come from the gospels, such as Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.